Category Archives: The Arts

MoCA Mural

MOCA is pleased to announce a new, outdoor commission from artist and writer Jibade-Khalil Huffman, on view at the Museum starting at 7pm on Friday, August 14

This large-scale, public work will be visible from the street, and can be experienced by walking or driving by MOCA on McCormick Street anytime, though optimal viewing times are at or just after sunset. Click here for directions and parking information

Action Painting is a multimedia artwork installed on MOCA’s facade that includes a bold vinyl collage, multi-channel video projections and sound composition. This commission enabled the crystallization of an image and set of ideas Huffman has been building over the past year. The piece presents an open-ended exploration of the layers of violence, disenfranchisement and joy that mark the history of racism and resistance leading up to this time of mass protest against police violence and white supremacy culture in the United States. 

Paula Abdul

Friday, November 16th

Dancer, choreographer, singer, actress, and television personality. She began her career as a cheerleader for the Los Angeles Lakers at the age of 18 and later became the head choreographer for the Laker Girls, where she was discovered by The Jacksons. After choreographing music videos for Janet Jackson, Abdul became a choreographer at the height of the music video era and soon thereafter she was signed to Virgin Records. Her debut studio album Forever Your Girl (1988) became one of the most successful debut albums at that time, selling 7 million copies in the United States and setting a record for the most number-one singles from a debut album on the Billboard Hot 100 chart: “Straight Up”, “Forever Your Girl”, “Cold Hearted”, and “Opposites Attract”. Her six number one singles on the Billboard Hot 100 tie her with Diana Ross for seventh among the female solo performers who have topped the chart.
via artist’s wiki
Fox Theatre | 17 W Congress | 730pm

 

Les Miserables

Tuesday, September 4th-9th

Cameron Mackintosh presents the new production of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s Tony Award-winning musical phenomenon, Les Misérables, direct from an acclaimed two-and-a-half-year return to Broadway.  Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France, Les Misérables tells an unforgettable story of heartbreak, passion, and the resilience of the human spirit. Featuring the beloved songs “I Dreamed A Dream,” “On My Own,” “Stars,” “Bring Him Home,” “One Day More,” and many more, this epic and uplifting story has become one of the most celebrated musicals in theatrical history. With its glorious new staging and dazzlingly reimagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo, this breathtaking new production has left both audiences and critics awestruck.

Centennial Hall | 1020 E University | Tickets + Times

Wak Pow Wow

Saturday and Sunday, March 17th &18th

The annual inter-tribal activities and artisan’s marketplace featuring Native American tribes from around the United States, hosted by Southern Arizona’s Tohono O’odham Nation (Sonoran Desert People). Categories include team dancing, hoop dance, drum contest, owl dance, inter-tribal dances, and many more.
San Xavier | 1950 W San Xavier Rd | 10 am entry

Momix

Thursday, January 18th

A company of dancer-illusionists based in Washington, Connecticut, founded in 1981 by choreographer Moses Pendleton.  MOMIX developed out of work Pendleton did for a celebration of Erik Satie at the Paris Opera in 1978. The company is named after a solo, “Momix,” that Pendleton created for the 1980 Winter Olympics in Moscow, which derives its name from a milk supplement fed to veal calves. An offshoot of the dance company Pilobolus, which Pendleton co-founded in 1971, MOMIX presents works that combine acrobatics, dance, gymnastics, mime, props, and film in a theatrical setting. The company has successfully toured internationally, performing on five continents. via wiki
Centennial Hall |  1020 E University | 7pm

RENT

Friday, November 3rd

Rent is a rock musical with music, lyrics, and book by Jonathan Larson, loosely based on Giacomo Puccini’s opera La Bohème. It tells the story of a group of impoverished young artists struggling to survive and create a life in New York City’s East Village in the thriving days of Bohemian Alphabet City, under the shadow of HIV/AIDS.

The musical was first seen in a workshop production at New York Theatre Workshop in 1993. This same Off-Broadway theatre was also the musical’s initial home following its official 1996 opening. The show’s creator, Jonathan Larson, died suddenly of an aortic dissection, believed to have been caused by undiagnosed Marfan syndrome, the night before the Off-Broadway premiere. The show won a Pulitzer Prize, and the production was a hit. The musical moved to Broadway’s larger Nederlander Theatre on April 29, 1996.

On Broadway, Rent gained critical acclaim and won a Tony Award for Best Musical among other awards. The Broadway production closed on September 7, 2008 after a 12-year run of 5,123 performances. On February 14, 2016, the musical Wicked surpassed Rent’s number of performances with a 2pm matinee, pushing Rent from the tenth- to eleventh-longest-running Broadway show. The production grossed over $280 million.

The success of the show led to several national tours and numerous foreign productions. In 2005, it was adapted into a motion picture featuring most of the original cast members. via wiki

Centennial Hall | 1020 E. University Blvd | 7pm

 

Val Kilmer as Citizen Twain

Saturday, August 5th

In Citizen Twain, Val Kilmer presents the legend as we’ve never encountered him, with all his glorious contradictions intact, all his strengths and weaknesses in play. Poised on the shadowy border of life and death and in a realm outside of time, Twain is part stand-up comic and part philosopher, an immortal intelligence in a mortal body, both wildly hilarious and deeply somber. With eternity on his mind and whiskey and cigar smoke on his breath, Twain threatens to upstage God himself as he ponders existence’s great issues, from man’s capacity for cruelty to the idiocy of politicians. Twain’s reach as a thinker and conversationalist is shown to be virtually boundless in Kilmer’s play, ranging from matters of science and technology to questions of morality and myth, and proving Twain correct in his assertion that he was not “an American” at all— he was “the American.” Period. via artist fb
Rialto Theatre | 318 E Congress | 7pm