Paula Abdul

Friday, November 16th

Dancer, choreographer, singer, actress, and television personality. She began her career as a cheerleader for the Los Angeles Lakers at the age of 18 and later became the head choreographer for the Laker Girls, where she was discovered by The Jacksons. After choreographing music videos for Janet Jackson, Abdul became a choreographer at the height of the music video era and soon thereafter she was signed to Virgin Records. Her debut studio album Forever Your Girl (1988) became one of the most successful debut albums at that time, selling 7 million copies in the United States and setting a record for the most number-one singles from a debut album on the Billboard Hot 100 chart: “Straight Up”, “Forever Your Girl”, “Cold Hearted”, and “Opposites Attract”. Her six number one singles on the Billboard Hot 100 tie her with Diana Ross for seventh among the female solo performers who have topped the chart.
via artist’s wiki
Fox Theatre | 17 W Congress | 730pm

 

Maria Bamford

Saturday, November 10th

Much of Bamford’s work examines the relationship between “people” — generally well-intentioned friends and family — and those who grapple with depression or anxiety or any other challenge to the psyche. Her act is a series of monologues and mini-skits performed rapid fire and often without regard for transition. Deploying a range of deadpan voices, she mimics the faux-enlightened who hover around the afflicted, offering toothless platitudes, bootstrapping pep talks or concern warped by self-interest. The humor of any given moment relies not so much on punch lines as it does on the impeccably timed swerves of her tone, the interplay between Bamford’s persona and those of all the people who don’t get her. via artist’s wiki
Rialto | 318 E Congress | 7pm

 

 

Kevin Hart

Sunday, November 4th

Kevin Hart’s comedic style, particularly in his stand-up routines are based on his racial, physical, familial and gender role experiences. His stand-up frequently invokes self-deprecation, derived from his experiences as a shorter-than-median (5’2″), black, adult male, with an extended black family, trying to navigate his career and personal paths in life. He frequently talks about his fears of being less than ideally physically gifted, the resulting ways in which they intersect with his masculinity, sexuality, traditional male gender role, as well as the experiences and dynamics of his social interactions, and how he fails to live up to the traditional definitions and notions of them.

Kevin Hart has spoken about both his acceptance of his vulnerability with the issues and the painful experiences with his perceived shortcomings as well as the society and family he belongs to as being the primary sources of his comedic material and humour. In particular, this has included acceptance of both his height and the resulting roles in both his personal and professional life he’s often given. via artist wiki

TCC | 260 S Church | 7pm

things to do and places to be all month long